Phillips says process reduces sulfur in gasoline up to 99%

Phillips Petroleum Co., Bartlesville, Okla., said it has started-up a 6,000 b/d unit to demonstrate a proprietary sulfur removal technology that could remove up to 99% of sulfur from gasoline.


By the OGJ Online Staff

HOUSTON, Apr. 26 -- Phillips Petroleum Co., Bartlesville, Okla., said it has started a 6,000 b/d unit to demonstrate a proprietary sulfur removal technology.

Phillips said the unit, located at its 125,000 b/d Borger, Tex., refinery, proved that S Zorb Sulfur Removal Technology can reduce sulfur levels in gasoline to 5 ppm for some feedstocks. The process can remove 99% of sulfur from gasoline, said the company.

This result will more than meet the US Environmental Protection Agency's standard of 30 ppm by 2004.

"S Zorb SRT can help refiners meet these requirements with a minimal loss in octane, very low volume loss, and low consumption of hydrogen, while operating at cycle lengths consistent with fluid catalytic cracking units," said a statement.

Thurman Nance, general manager of the Borger refinery, said the unit went from process concept to start-up in 18 months and reached design capacity within 72 hr of gasoline feed introduction.

The technology has been licensed to Marathon Ashland Petroleum LLC.

Phillips said it is also developing the process for diesel fuel. A pilot test is underway at a research facility.

The company claimed laboratory test runs on diesel show very low sulfur levels are achievable at 275-500 psig, compared to a conventional treating pressure of 500-2,000 psig. The process can also be configured to run with no net chemical hydrogen consumption, which could save refiners money.

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