FERC approves startup of Mountain Valley natural gas pipeline

June 12, 2024
Equitrans Midstream was granted approval June 11 by the US FERC to put its Mountain Valley natural gas pipeline into operation.

Equitrans Midstream Corp. was granted approval June 11 by the US Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) to put its 303-mile, 2 bcfd Mountain Valley natural gas pipeline (MVP) into operation.

FERC’s authorization is the final hurdle for the controversial $7.8-billion project designed to move Marcellus and Utica shale gas to Mid-Atlantic markets. The pipeline was originally scheduled to begin flows in 2018 but was repeatedly delayed by litigation involving environmental concerns and landowners.

The pipeline was scheduled to start operations in May, but Equitrans delayed the start to run additional safety tests (OGJ Online, Apr. 24, 2024).

“We find that Mountain Valley has adequately stabilized the areas disturbed by construction and that restoration and stabilization of the construction work area is proceeding satisfactorily,” Terry Turpin, FERC’s director of the Office of Energy Projects, said in the order. The commission granted authorization based on “Mountain Valley’s recent construction status reports and supplemental filings, our regular compliance monitoring reporting, a staff inspection the week of May 13-17, and our communications with the Department of Transportation’s Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration,” Turpin added.

The 42-in OD pipeline runs from Wetzel County, WV, to an interconnect with Transcontinental Gas Pipeline Co. at compressor station 165 in Pittsylvania County, Va. 

“We are pleased with the agencies’ decisions and the related communications regarding in-service authorization for the MVP project,” Natalie Cox, an Equitrans spokeswoman, said in a June 11 statement. “Final preparations are underway to begin commercial operations.”

 

About the Author

Cathy Landry | Washington Correspondent

Cathy Landry has worked over 20 years as a journalist, including 17 years as an energy reporter with Platts News Service (now S&P Global) in Washington and London.

She has served as a wire-service reporter, general news and sports reporter for local newspapers and a feature writer for association and company publications.

Cathy has deep public policy experience, having worked in 15 years in Washington energy circles.

She earned a master’s degree in government from The Johns Hopkins University and studied newspaper journalism and psychology at Syracuse University.