Oregon LNG project leaves the field

NorthernStar Natural Gas, Houston, announced May 4 it was suspending development of its Bradwood Landing LNG terminal near Astoria, Ore.

Warren R. True
Chief Technology Editor-LNG/Gas Processing

HOUSTON, May 5 -- NorthernStar Natural Gas, Houston, announced May 4 it was suspending development of its Bradwood Landing LNG terminal near Astoria, Ore.

The terminal was to have sent up to 1.3 bcfd into Northwest US markets and was one of three LNG projects proposed for Oregon. Also part of the project was a 36.3-mile pipeline.

In a company announcement, NorthernStar Pres. Paul Soanes cited extended delays in the processing of state and federal permits and the “difficult investment environment.” He said, “[The] challenging regulatory environment,” in particular, “gives investors pause.”

Development work on Bradwood Landing began nearly 6 years ago on the site of the former Bradwood lumber mill with a natural deepwater port on the Columbia River in Clatsop County. The US Coast Guard determined the Columbia River could be made suitable for LNG marine traffic in its decision of Apr. 24, 2009.

The project received approval from the US Federal Energy Regulatory Commission in September 2008 after 3½ years of “scientific and technical review,” the company said. On Mar. 20, 2008, the Clatsop County Board of Commissioners approved Bradwood’s consolidated land-use application.

Who’s left
Bradwood Landing’s departure from the LNG terminal scene in Oregon leaves two other projects facing the same head winds of public opposition.

Oregon LNG would build and operate a terminal with berthing and three full-containment, 160,000-cu m tanks on the Skipanon Peninsula in Warrenton, Ore. With completion targeting early 2013, the terminal will operate as a tolling facility. Oregon Pipeline, an affiliate, plans a 120-mile pipeline connected to a hub in Molalla, Ore.

Jordan Cove Energy Project would build a terminal on an undeveloped site within the Oregon International Port of Coos Bay that would have normal sendout of 1 bcfd and peak of 1.2 bcfd. Also on site would be storage capacity in two, 160,000-cu m full-containment tanks and NGL recovery capability.

Contact Warren R. True at warrent@ogjonline.com.

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