EIA: US carbon dioxide emissions up 1% last year

The US Energy Information Administration reports that US carbon dioxide emissions from burning fossil fuels rose 1% in 1999, increasing from 1,495 million tonnes of carbon in 1998 to 1,511 million tonnes in 1999. EIA said, while the 1999 growth rate of 1% was slightly below the average annual growth rate of 1.2% during 1990-99, it was higher than the 1998 growth rate of 0.1%.


Washington, DC�The US Energy Information Administration reports that US carbon dioxide emissions from burning fossil fuels rose 1% in 1999, increasing from 1,495 million tonnes of carbon in 1998 to 1,511 million tonnes in 1999. EIA said, while the 1999 growth rate of 1% was slightly below the average annual growth rate of 1.2% during 1990-99, it was higher than the 1998 growth rate of 0.1%.

"Carbon dioxide emissions account for over 80% of US greenhouse gas emissions and are a good early indicator of the level of, and rate of change in, total US greenhouse gas emissions," said EIA.

EIA said transportation-related CO2 emissions, which account for about a third of total emissions, increased 2.9% in 1999 as a healthy economy encouraged travel and the delivery of goods. Residential emissions increased 0.4%, and commercial emissions declined by 0.4%.

Despite rapid growth of the economy, energy-related industrial CO2 emissions in 1999 increased only 0.2%, however, which EIA said may reflect below-normal growth in the energy-intensive industries.

EIA said US CO2 emissions could have been 29 million tonnes higher under normal weather and nonfossil-fuel generation patterns. It said higher emissions due to increased electricity consumption during the hotter-than-normal summer were more than offset by reduced emissions from a warmer-than-normal winter that lowered heating fuels use.

EIA will continue to refine its estimates of 1999 CO2 emissions as more energy data become available. An inventory of all greenhouse gas emissions will be released in October.

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