EPA proposed greenhouse gas reporting rule

The US Environmental Protection Agency proposed the first comprehensive national system for reporting emissions of carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases produced by major sources.

OGJ editors
HOUSTON, Mar. 10 -- The US Environmental Protection Agency proposed the first comprehensive national system for reporting emissions of carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases produced by major sources.

The other gases covered by the proposed rule are methane, nitrous oxide, hydrofluorocarbons, perfluorocarbons, sulfur hexafluoride, and other fluorinated gases, including nitrogen trifluoride and hydrofluorinated ethers.

EPA Administrator Lisa P. Jackson said the reporting would provide comprehensive and accurate data about the production of GHG emissions. The proposal covers about 13,000 plants, accounting for 85-90% of GHG emissions in the US, she said.

The rule is being developed under the authority of the Clean Air Act. The proposed rule will be open for public comment for 60 days after publication in the Federal Register. Public hearings are scheduled Apr. 6-7 in Arlington, Va., and Apr. 16 in Sacramento, Calif.

The new reporting requirements would apply to suppliers of fossil fuels and industrial chemicals, manufacturers of motor vehicles and engines, and large direct emitters of GHG emissions equal to or greater than a threshold of 25,000 tonnes/year.

Jackson said most small businesses would not be required to report their emissions because their emissions fall well below the threshold.

The first annual report would be submitted to EPA in 2011 for the calendar year 2010, except for vehicle and engine manufacturers, which would begin reporting for model year 2011.

EPA estimates that the expected cost to comply with the reporting requirements to the private sector would be $160 million for the first year. In subsequent years, the estimated costs for the private sector would be $127 million/year.

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