Obama selects DOI inspector general to chair Recovery Act board

US President Barack H. Obama selected Earl E. Devaney, who has been the US Department of the Interior's inspector general for nearly 10 years, to chair the recently enacted Recovery Act's transparency and accountability board.

Feb 27th, 2009

US President Barack H. Obama selected Earl E. Devaney, who has been the US Department of the Interior's inspector general for nearly 10 years, to chair the recently enacted Recovery Act's transparency and accountability board.

Obama announced Devaney's appointment during a Feb. 23 meeting with US governors in which he announced that Vice President Joseph R. Biden Jr. will oversee implementation of the economic stimulus legislation's provisions.

Devaney has led several important investigations at DOI since coming to the department in August 1999. One of his most recent inquiries documented outrageous behavior ranging from blatant conflicts of interest with regulated companies to drug abuse and sexual misconduct within the US Minerals Management Service's royalties management program.

"Joe and I can't think of a more tenacious and efficient guardian of the hard-earned tax dollars the American people have entrusted us to wisely invest," Obama said.

Devaney said in a statement posted at the DOI office of inspector general's website that his goals for the Recovery Act's transparency and accountability board are simple: "First, I hope to provide the American people with the historic level of accountability and transparency envisioned in the Recovery Act. Second, I intend to develop a board which will work tirelessly to prevent fraud, waste and abuse in a collaborative manner with all levels of federal, state and local governments.

"Telling stakeholders what they need to know, not necessarily what they want to know, has been a hallmark of my federal government career, a practice I will continue s chairman of the Recovery Accountability and Transparency Board," he continued.

Devaney began his federal employment in 1970 when he joined the US Secret Service as a special agent following his graduation from Franklin and Marshall College in Pennsylvania. He received five US Department of the Treasury special achievement citations and numerous honors and awards from professional organizations before he retired from the Secret Service in 1991.

He then joined the US Environmental Protection Agency as its criminal enforcement, forensics and training office director where he oversaw all of EPA's criminal investigators, its forensics service center and the National Enforcement Training Institute before President Bill Clinton nominated him as DOI inspector general in 1999.

Contact Nick Snow at nicks@pennwell.com

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