Developing nations' energy consumption declines

Energy consumption in the world's developing countries has declined 2.3% over the last year, 'seriously' hampering economic and social development performance in these nations, the United Nations Committee on Energy and Natural Resources heard yesterday in New York.


NEW YORK�Energy consumption in the world's developing countries has declined 2.3% over the last year, "seriously" hampering economic and social development performance in these nations, the United Nations Committee on Energy and Natural Resources heard yesterday.

Joanne Disan, director of the Department of Economic and Social Affairs' Division for Sustainable Development, told the committee in her introductory remarks that this drop was in sharp contrast to the global tendency toward increased consumption among Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) countries, where energy demand stuck to a 10-year growth trend.

OECD countries currently represent almost 60% of total world commercial energy demand, noted Disan.

A UN secretary general report on the coordination of energy activities with the UN system was also updated at yesterday's session. It was reported that the ad-hoc Inter-agency Task Force on Energy had been "successful in its initial efforts to establish a common system-wide approach to energy and sustainable development and facilitate regular communication and information exchange."

Current efforts at cooperation with energy sector agencies outside the UN system would further enhance overall cooperation, said the report.

The secretary general's report added critical issues raised by the committee on the subject of achieving a sustainable energy future had been well received by the Economic and Social Council, the Commission on Sustainable Development, and the ad-hoc Open-Ended Intergovernmental Group of Experts on Energy and Sustainable Development.

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