Shell Guam settles EPA toxic chemical reporting allegation

Shell Guam Inc. agreed to pay $30,590 to settle charges that it violated a federal environmental law by not submitting required toxic chemical reports, the US Environmental Protection Agency said on Oct. 5.

Nick Snow
OGJ Washington Editor

WASHINGTON, DC, Oct. 7 -- Shell Guam Inc. agreed to pay $30,590 to settle charges that it violated a federal environmental law by not submitting required toxic chemical reports, the US Environmental Protection Agency said on Oct. 5.

The Royal Dutch Shell PLC subsidiary agreed to pay a $7,950 fine as part of the settlement, and to donate $28,300 to the US territory’s fire department for personal protective equipment, EPA said.

EPA said Shell Guam regularly uses polycylic aromatic compounds, naphthalene, and other toxic chemicals as components of fuel that it repackages at its facility. The company allegedly failed to submit toxic release inventory reports to EPA of the amounts of chemicals it processed in 2007, as required under the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act.

Facilities that process more than 25,000 lb/year of the chemicals cited in this case must report releases of these chemicals annually to EPA and the state or territory in which the plant is located, the federal environmental regulator said.

EPA said it compiles toxic chemical information annually from the previous year to produce a publicly available toxics release inventory. It said this database estimates the amounts of each toxic chemical released into the environment; treated or recycled on-site; or transferred off-site for waste management, and also provides a trend analysis of toxic chemical releases.

Contact Nick Snow at nicks@pennwell.com.

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