FERC staff issues final EIS for Annova LNG Brownsville project

The proposed Annova LNG Brownsville natural gas liquefaction plant and export terminal along the Brownsville Ship Channel in Cameron County, Tex., would have adverse environmental impacts which mostly could be reduced to less-than-significant levels if recommended mitigation measures are implemented, FERC staff said on Apr. 19 in a final environmental impact statement.

Apr 22nd, 2019

The proposed Annova LNG Brownsville natural gas liquefaction plant and export terminal along the Brownsville Ship Channel in Cameron County, Tex., would have adverse environmental impacts which mostly could be reduced to less-than-significant levels if recommended mitigation measures are implemented, the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission’s staff said on Apr. 19 in a final environmental impact statement.

However, the project would have significant construction noise impacts during 6 months of nighttime pile-driving, it added. These impacts, combined with noises from constructing other LNG export facilities in the area and sedimentary erosion in the channel from vessel traffic, could threaten the federally listed aplomado falcon, ocelot, and jaguarundi’s habitat, the final EIS said.

Natural gas would be delivered to the project site through a non-jurisdictional intrastate, 36-inch-diameter gas pipeline lateral that would be constructed, owned, and operated by a third party separate from Annova. Up to 125 LNG vessels would be required to export 6.95 million tons/year of LNG from the project, the final EIS said.

It said the project would consist of a pipeline meter station, natural gas pre-treatment and liquefaction facilities, two LNG storage tanks, a marine dock and LNG transfer facilities, control room and administration/maintenance building, site access road, and utilities (power, water, and communication systems).

The final EIS recommended that the project’s sponsors complete appropriate consultations with the US Fish & Wildlife Service and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s Fisheries Division, and file all outstanding cultural resource reports and agency comments for the FERC staff to review before construction is allowed to begin.

It noted that the US Coast Guard has issued a letter of recommendation indicating that the Brownsville Ship Channel would be considered suitable for marine traffic associated with the project. Estimated air emissions impacts would not exceed the National Ambient Air Quality Standards and construction and operational noise impacts would be reduced to acceptable levels through mitigation and the FERC staff’s recommendations, it indicated.

Contact Nick Snow at
nicks@pennwell.com

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