Corridor sees 67 tcf in New Brunswick shale

Consulting engineers arrived at a best estimate of 67.3 tcf of gas in place in the overpressured Carboniferous Frederick Brook shale in the Sussex and Elgin subbasins in southern New Brunswick, said Corridor Resources Inc., Halifax.

By OGJ editors
HOUSTON, July 1
-- Consulting engineers arrived at a best estimate of 67.3 tcf of gas in place in the overpressured Carboniferous Frederick Brook shale in the Sussex and Elgin subbasins in southern New Brunswick, said Corridor Resources Inc., Halifax.

The F-58 well in McCully field has been flowing at a stable rate of 150 Mcfd at 550 psi wellhead pressure into the McCully gathering system for 14 months and has recovered 69 MMcf of gas following a small 9-tonne frac in the albitic/dolomitic (lower) section of Frederick Brook, Corridor said.

The McCully P-76 well flowed gas at the rate of 150 Mcfd for 76 hr at 32 psi final wellhead pressure after a 14-tonne frac before the well was completed uphole in the McCully sands.

Depth to the top of the shale is 2,000-3,000 m in much of the area, but the shale is so thick that more than 1 km of exposure can be attained without horizontal drilling.

Free gas in place in the shale averages 370 bcf/sq mile and exceeds 600 bcf in thicker areas, and the estimate does not consider adsorbed gas within existing kerogen which may add greatly to the total volume of gas in place.

The consulting engineers’ report will assist in fashioning a longer-term plan for appraising and development the shale, Corridor said.

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