Editor's Perspective

FORGET BIPARTISANSHIP; LET THE FIGHT BEGIN

January 5, 2001 Somehow, the US must survive all the nonsense plaguing the nation's capital about bipartisanship. Nature hates bipartisanship.

ANWR LEASING A LANDMINE WAITING FOR BUSH

January 12, 2001 At first glance it seems incongruous: an outgoing President, grandstanding for posterity, first locking development out of one third of the national forest area of the US then declining to permanently declare an arctic wildlife refuge off limits.

SULFUR REGULATIONS BLAMED FOR REFINERY SHUTDOWN

January 19, 2001 Excessively aggressive environmental regulation took another bite out of US energy security on Jan. 17.

EUROPE NOT COWED BY CALIFORNIA'S CRISIS

January 26, 2001 California's crisis notwithstanding, energy deregulation is alive and well in Europe.

SIBLING CONFLICT OVER OFFSHORE LEASING

February 2, 2001 Sibling rivalry at the top levels of government in the US will shine useful national light on the issue of offshore oil and gas leasing.

WHAT THE PHILLIPS-TOSCO DEAL SAYS ABOUT US REFINING

February 9, 2001 Analysis of Phillips Petroleum Co.'s agreement to acquire of Tosco Corp. has tended to take the perspective of investors. While there's nothing wrong with that, the deal is just as interesting from the point of view of other US refiners.

WHO'S IGNORING CLIMATE CHANGE?

February 16, 2001 A problem with the politics of climate change is that discussion of the issue too frequently degrades into a righteousness contest. What the issue most needs, however, is a careful examination of the very complex and still uncertain set of facts underlying the issue-and thoughtful discourse.

OF WHITE HOUSE FURNITURE AND DIESEL SULFUR

February 23, 2001 An industry group is trying to fix part of the mess former President Bill Clinton made on his way out of office.

ANOTHER CONSPIRACY PROBE TURNS UP NOTHING

March 2, 2001 Ho-hum. Another conspiracy hunt. Another empty bag.

A GREENWARD LURCH ON FARM POLICY

March 9, 2001 An outbreak of livestock sickness in Europe has unleashed retrograde political impulses not far removed from energy.

NO SNOW? BLAME IT ON GLOBAL WARMING

March 16, 2001 Mayor Richard Bowe of Bryam Township, NJ, has a complaint with an analog in the politics of global warming.

BUSH'S TURN ON CO2 HELPS GAS PRODUCERS, TOO

March 23, 2001 More than a few producers of natural gas probably have mixed feelings about President George W. Bush's decision this month not to regulate carbon dioxide emitted from power plants as an air pollutant. Some might be altogether disappointed.

EARLY ENERGY POLICY PROPOSALS AVOID THE BIG MISTAKES

March 30, 2001 Each congressional side has fired its first volley over US energy policy, and the potential damage seems to fall within tolerable boundaries. In fact, some good might even result.

THE FADING OF GERMANY'S GREENS

April 6, 2001 Green politics is turning brown around the edges in Germany.

THE POLITICAL URGE TO MANIPULATE MARKETS

April 13, 2001 It is possible to remove price controls, as the enlightened world did on energy in the 1980s. It is more difficult to snuff the perverse political urge that gives them rise.

SULFUR, ARSENIC, AND SUSPICIOUS REGULATION

April 20, 2001 Recent experience of the oil industry hangs a suspicious cloud over a dispute about arsenic in drinking water.

OPEC QUOTAS STILL YIELD TO ECONOMICS, POLITICS

April 27, 2001 Conditions of the present oil market don't overturn the fundamentals of economics and politics.

ELK CONTROVERSY CLOUDS LARGER ISSUE OF LAND ACCESS

May 4, 2001 It happens in Washington, DC. Clumsy handling of a minor point in otherwise valuable commentary gets all the attention.

CALL FOR FUEL PRICE INVESTIGATION BAD FOR COUNTRY

May 11, 2001 The US needs the oil and gas industry to be producing oil and natural gas, not answering mean-spirited questions from lawmakers who won't listen to the answers.

DEMOCRATIC GRIPES GOOD FOR BUSH ENERGY PLAN

May 18, 2001 While the Bush administration's energy policy will take time to fully assess, reaction of the political opposition provides an inverse gauge of its merits.
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