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  1. US Supreme Court lowers curtain on an activist stage

    The international oil and gas industry escaped a legal hazard on Apr. 17 when the US Supreme Court narrowed the geographic scope of an antique law on civil infractions involving noncitizens. In Kiobel v. Royal Dutch Petroleum, the high court held that the Alien Tort Statute doesn’t apply to acts committed outside the US. Enacted in 1798, the statute provides foreigners a judicial remedy in the US for violations of “the law of nations.” Congress acted it after foreign ambassadors fell victim to mistreatment in the US—in one case verbal abuse by a countryman and in another the wrongful arrest of a domestic servant—and had no legal recourse. It also gave legal footing to actions related to piracy. For nearly 200 years, little happened under the law. That changed in 1980. Then, according to an Oct. 5, 2009, article in Oil & Gas Journal, Paraguayan citizens living in New York filed suit in New York against a Paraguayan police official they said tortured and murdered a relative in their homeland. “When the courts allowed the lawsuit to proceed,” wrote Jonathan Drimmer of Steptoe & Johnson LLP and Jennifer Millerwise Dyck of APCO Worldwide, “dozens of others quickly followed.” Suddenly, the Alien Tort Statute became an avenue into US courts—and news media—for cases alleging international misbehavior. Targets at first tended to be officials of oppressive regimes. Damage awards, according to Drimmer and Dyck, often exceeded $10 million and sometimes $100 million. In the mid-1990s, litigation targets became transnational companies. At the time of the OGJ article, at least 128 Alien Tort Statute cases had been brought against corporations. Many were oil and gas companies. The US judicial system had become a stage for antioil theatrics in cases activists didn’t need to win. Even when defendants disproved the allegations—as, like Shell, they usually did—lawsuits alleging abuses of people and nature smirched their reputations. There will be fewer of them now. Justice has prevailed. (Online Apr. 19, 2013; author’s e-mail: bobt@ogjonline.com)

    Online Articles

    Online Articles

    Fri, 19 Apr 2013

  2. US Supreme Court lowers curtain on an activist stage

    The international oil and gas industry escaped a legal hazard on Apr. 17 when the US Supreme Court narrowed the geographic scope of an antique law on civil infractions involving noncitizens.

    Magazine Articles

    Magazine Articles

    Mon, 29 Apr 2013

  3. US Supreme Court refuses to hear challenge to EPA’s E15 rollout

    The US Supreme Court refused to hear a legal challenge to the US Environmental Protection agency’s program introducing gasoline with a 15% ethanol blend to the domestic marketplace.

    Online Articles

    Online Articles

    Mon, 24 Jun 2013

  4. AFPM petitions US Supreme Court to overturn E15 decision

    The American Fuel & Petrochemical Manufacturers (AFPM) asked the US Supreme Court to overturn the District of Columbia Circuit Appeals Court’s August 2012 decision to dismiss it and other oil industry associations’ legal challenges of the US Environmental Protection Agency’s partial approval of ...

    Online Articles

    Online Articles

    Fri, 12 Apr 2013

  1. API mulls taking E15 legal challenge to US Supreme Court

    Online Articles

    Online Articles

    Tue, 29 Jan 2013

  2. API, others appeal E15 standing ruling to US Supreme Court

    The American Petroleum Institute and eight other trade associations asked the US Supreme Court to overturn a federal appeals court’s ruling that they lack standing to legally challenge the US Environmental Protection Agency’s introduction of gasoline with a 15% ethanol blend into the US market.

    Online Articles

    Online Articles

    Thu, 21 Feb 2013

  3. US Supreme Court to hear Exxon Valdez punitive damages appeal

    The US Supreme Court agreed to hear an appeal of the $2.5 billion punitive damages award stemming from the 1989 grounding of the Exxon Valdez tanker and resulting oil spill in Alaska's Prince William Sound.

    Online Articles

    Online Articles

    Tue, 30 Oct 2007

  4. US Supreme Court to hear Exxon Valdez appeal

    The US Supreme Court agreed Oct. 29 to hear an appeal of the $2.5 billion punitive damages award stemming from the 1989 grounding of the tanker Exxon Valdez and subsequent crude oil spill in Alaska’s Prince William Sound.

    Magazine Articles

    Magazine Articles

    Mon, 5 Nov 2007

  5. US Supreme Court rules in climate change litigation threat

    The National Petrochemical & Refiners Association lauded the US Supreme Court's decision on June 20 to reject attempts to address greenhouse gas emissions through the use of common law "nuisance" lawsuits.

    Magazine Articles

    Magazine Articles

    Mon, 27 Jun 2011

  6. US Supreme Court rules in climate change litigation threat

    The National Petrochemical & Refiners Association lauded the US Supreme Court ’s decision on June 20 to reject attempts to address greenhouse gas emissions through the use of common law “nuisance” lawsuits.

    Online Articles

    Online Articles

    Mon, 20 Jun 2011

  7. US Supreme Court to hear part of Exxon Mobil's appeal

    The US Supreme Court agreed to hear part of Exxon Mobil Corp.'s appeal of a verdict against the major concerning a class-action lawsuit that involves up to 10,000 current and former service station dealers.

    Online Articles

    Online Articles

    Mon, 18 Oct 2004

  8. US Supreme Court upholds Unocal's reformulated gasoline patent

    The US Supreme Court decision Tuesday upholding Unocal Corp.�s patent for cleaner-burning reformulated gasoline (RFG) calls into question the feasibility of the federal Clean Air Act that it�s supposed to advance, said an industry official.

    Online Articles

    Online Articles

    Tue, 20 Feb 2001

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